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TorridLuvr

@TorridLuvr | California, USA
Member since March 15, 2020
I am the Creator of the Community The Torrid Tribe. Please pop over for some uncensored stimulating conversion and content. This is a no boundary safe place to get your vibe on. It's not just clothes that I love... Being a mom to 4 amazing daughters is the best thing I can take credit for in this world. I am a gypsy - travel and culture are my top favorite things in life. Being a foodie is my lifelong obsession. Offering a hug to each of you.
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The Rabbit trail of CDC and Fauci of the possibiity of a gold strike with Corona Virus

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@Caylinrosejanet

Check out this amazing Body Illusion Art 💙

https://www.johannesstoetterart.com/

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We fried up some Alaskan salmon we caught from our 2019 Alaska trip. We booked a private charter boat and an amazing and knowledgeable fishing captain in Ketchikan, Alaska. We had caught 7 gorgeous huge salmon and we had them filet them and ship them back to us. We still have 2 more frozen packages left. Also, we beer battered Amanda's fish we caught yesterday and made fish tacos today for lunch. Super yummy. 5 pics

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Amanda is out Deep fishing today. So far she has caught 5 fish. They are all filet'ed and ready prepped for today's lunch- beer battered fish 😄

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/927566/amanda-is-out-deep-fishing-today-so-far-she-has-caught-5-fish-they-are-all-fileted-and-ready-prep

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Torrid Luvr is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Torrid Luvr's Zoom Meeting
Time: Aug 6, 2021 11:00 AM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83283069917?pwd=bndXdHVEV2wwTDlNRUpNZjF4eFowdz09

Meeting ID: 832 8306 9917
Passcode: 809011
One tap mobile
+16699009128,,83283069917#,,,,809011# US (San Jose)
+13462487799,,83283069917#,,,,
809011# US (Houston)

Dial by your location
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Meeting ID: 832 8306 9917
Passcode: 809011
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/keBwkDt7Df

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The Old Spaghetti Factory was originally a train depot. There is a real train car in the middle of the restaurant and you can dine in it like a diner car.
@Nicholas_Ross here is the decor I was telling you about. Victorian decor, tiffany lamps, luxurious brocade and velvet upholstery seats, dark rich wood.

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Delicious pasta for dinner at The Old Spaghetti Factory. 5 pics
@Nicholas_Ross this is the Mizithra cheese I was telling you about in Pic #1. I will post pics of the restaurant for you in another post.
Hugs to The Chef 🥰

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Day #30 of Respect The Constitution

The 2nd Amendment is the most important legal right US Citizens have to protect themselves as honored to us by the Constitution.   The Leftwing Democrats have been doing their best to abolish our rights to bear arms and the 2nd Amendment.  Specifically, the 2nd Amendment states,  A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.

This last day of the 30 Days of Respect of the Constitution is dedicated to Kyle Rittenhouse.  His case will be historic in defining the 2nd Amendment. 

Attorneys Will Argue Kyle Rittenhouse Is Protected By 2nd Amendment, Wisconsin Law

The attorney for 17-year-old Kyle Rittenhouse has said he planned to argue that his client was part of a “well regulated Militia” and as such, couldn’t be charged for carrying a rifle at a riot because he was protected by the Second Amendment.

It’s likely that Rittenhouse’s attorney, John Pierce of Pierce Bainbridge, (now replace with Barnes) will say that Wisconsin’s ban on firearms for persons under age 18 is unconstitutional because the Founding Fathers expected and, and sometimes required, juveniles to have and bear arms for their colonies, NBC News reported.

The argument is basically that Wisconsin law violates the Second Amendment.

More info and Resource:
https://policetribune.com/attorneys-will-argue-kyle-rittenhouse-is-protected-by-2nd-amendment-wisconsin-law/

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Lets do this !

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A wave of reason is coming to throw out the RINOs

Romney Gets Nasty Wake-Up Call — Receives Only 4% of Votes in 2024 National Republican Primary Poll

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/920731/a-wave-of-reason-is-coming-to-throw-out-the-rinos-romney-gets-nasty-wake-up-call-receives-only

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The Lefty Democrats sold their souls to voters that are coming here illegally

House Democrats Pass Radical Bill That Will Allow Illegal Immigrants to Work for Members of Congress

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/920716/the-lefty-democrats-sold-their-souls-to-voters-that-are-come-here-illegally-house-democrats-pass-ra

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Day #28 of Respect The Constitution

Seven surprising facts about the framers and the Constitutional Convention.

1. Several framers met with untimely deaths.

Was there a curse of the Constitution? Alexander Hamilton was famously killed by Aaron Burr in 1804, but he wasn’t even the first framer of the U.S. Constitution to die in a duel with a political rival. In 1802, North Carolina delegate Richard Spaight was mortally wounded by a dueling pistol fired by sitting congressman John Stanly. Four years later, Virginian George Wythe died of arsenic poisoning, likely at the hand of a debt-riddled grandnephew and heir. Pennsylvania delegate Gouverneur Morris died in 1816 after a ghastly bit of self-surgery in which he unsuccessfully attempted to dislodge a urinary tract blockage with a piece of whale bone, while New York’s John Lansing mysteriously vanished in December 1829 after leaving his Manhattan hotel room to mail a letter.

2. Rhode Island boycotted the Constitutional Convention.

America’s littlest state had a big independence streak. Rhode Island, distrustful of a powerful federal government, was the only one of the 13 original states to refuse to send delegates to the Constitutional Convention. It was a decision that rankled even the normally temperate George Washington, who wrote in July 1787 that “Rhode Island … still perseveres in that impolitic, unjust, and one might add without much impropriety scandalous conduct, which seems to have marked all her public councils of late.” On the condition that a Bill of Rights be included, Rhode Island became the 13th state to ratify the Constitution on May 29, 1790, more than a year after Washington was sworn in as president.

3. Some big names were absent from the Constitutional Convention.

When Thomas Jefferson gushingly called the Constitutional Convention delegates “an assembly of demigods,” he wasn’t being full of himself. Jefferson was not among the founding fathers who gathered in Philadelphia; he was in Paris serving as minister to France. John Adams was also abroad, serving as minister to Great Britain. Samuel Adams, John Hancock and Patrick Henry—who turned down an invitation because he “smelt a rat in Philadelphia, tending toward the monarchy”—also did not participate.

4. Attendance was spotty.

When the Constitutional Convention opened on May 14, 1787, only delegates from Pennsylvania and Virginia were present. It wasn’t until May 25 that a quorum of seven states was achieved. Weather—ever the convenient excuse—was blamed for the tardiness, but the convention was plagued throughout with attendance issues. While James Madison boasted that he never left the proceedings for more than “a casual fraction of an hour,” his fellow delegates were not as fastidious. Nineteen of the 74 delegates to the convention never even attended a single session, and of the 55 delegates who did show up in Philadelphia, no more than 30 stayed for the full four months. New Hampshire’s delegation arrived two months late, by which time two of New York’s three delegates had left in opposition to the proceedings, leaving just Hamilton behind and depriving the state of a quorum to vote. Thus, Washington wrote that the Constitution was signed by “11 states and Colonel Hamilton.”

5. Not all the delegates who attended the convention signed the Constitution.

Although 55 delegates participated in the Constitutional Convention, there are only 39 signatures on the Constitution. Fourteen men, having already left Philadelphia, were not present for the signing, and only Delaware delegate John Dickinson had a proxy sign for him. Three delegates—Elbridge Gerry of Massachusetts and Edmund Randolph and George Mason of Virginia—were dissatisfied with the final document and refused to ink their signatures.

6. “We the People of the United States” was a late change.

The Constitution’s iconic opening line was not included in early drafts of the document. Instead, the preamble started with a much less pithy litany of individual states listed from north to south: “We the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts…” and so on. Credit for the late alteration goes to a five-person Committee of Style—comprised of Hamilton, Madison, Morris, William Samuel Johnson and Rufus King—and Morris is considered to have been responsible for composing much of the final text, including the revised preamble.

7. The man who hand-wrote the Constitution was not a delegate.

While Morris has been nicknamed the “Penman of the Constitution,” the real hand wielding the quill that scrawled the final copy of the Constitution belonged to Jacob Shallus. The assistant clerk of the Pennsylvania State Assembly was paid $30 and given just two days to write most of the document’s 4,543 words on four sheets of vellum parchment. While his script was exquisite, Shallus wasn’t totally flawless. Between the final article and the delegate signatures on the Constitution’s final page is an “errata” paragraph listing some of the minor errors he had made along with their corrections.

Resource: https://www.history.com/news/7-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-constitutional-convention

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Monday Meme
Credit: (my future Governor) Larry Elder 😍🇺🇸❤

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Its been that kinda day. Two of these Blue Hawaiians. Toasting to our beautiful girl Nala 💙

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Today my Nala earned her Forever Heavenly Puppy wings. She was the love of our family. I will miss her so much.

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Day #25 of Respect The Constitution

The 25th Amendment - Interesting and lots of information

The 25th Amendment addresses succession to the presidency and establishes procedures both for filling a vacancy in the office of the vice president and responding to presidential disabilities.

Interesting Fact: During Donald Trump's term, some initiated dialog about invoking Section 4 of the 25th Amendment against him. Still, the 25th Amendment exists to protect the democratically-elected President and the line of succession. It makes it difficult to unseat a President without proven just cause and majority consensus. TRUMP SQUASHED THAT IDEA

There is deep concern and we have seen evidence about the mental incompetence of Biden, which may push him out of his position as President. Could you imagine Kamala Harris or even Nancy Pelosi  succeeding to become President? Cringeworthy.

The 25th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution addresses what happens to the presidency and vice-presidency if the president and/or vice president dies, resigns or becomes incapacitated or disabled. Passed by Congress on July 6, 1965, the 25th Amendment was ratified by the states on February 10, 1967. Invoking the 25th Amendment has always been controversial, especially Article 4, which allows for removal of a president who is deemed incapacitated by any kind of illness—including mental illness—or injury.

What Is the 25th Amendment?

The need for a succession amendment came to light when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas, and there was confusion about whether Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson had also been injured and, if so, who would take their places in the line of succession.

Presidential Line of Succession

Prior to the 25th Amendment, presidential succession procedures existed, but they were vague and didn’t cover every contingency. Assumedly, the vice president would become president if the president died or resigned.

However, it wasn’t clear what should happen if the president was temporarily incapacitated or if the vice president was incapacitated. The 25th Amendment sought to address these concerns.

The original Constitution allowed for the vice president to become acting president if the president died, resigned or became debilitated, but it didn’t state who had the power to declare the president unfit to serve or prevent the president from returning to office.

In addition, it didn’t specify if an acting president should take over the “Office of the President” or only perform presidential duties until the president returned or a qualified replacement was found.

Presidential Succession Act

The Constitution also didn’t indicate who would assume the vice-presidency if the vice president became president, died or was debilitated. It only said that Congress could declare, “what Officer shall then act as President.”

In February 1792, Congress passed the Presidential Succession Act, placing the Majority Leader of the House of Representatives and the President Pro Tempore of the Senate in the line of succession. INSERT SCAREY THOUGHT OF NANCY PELOSI SUCCEDING AS OUR PRESIDENT

In 1943, the 20th Amendment cleared the way for the vice-president elect to become president if the president-elect died or was debilitated. In 1947, Congress reinstated the Speaker of the House and the President Pro Tempore to the line of succession ahead of the president’s cabinet members.

Whether all these changes were done in the best interest of American citizens, or to take advantage of a crisis and control who ruled the White House, is still a matter of debate.

Succession Confusion Before the 25th Amendment

Until the 25th Amendment, each administration came up with its own plan to handle presidential and vice-presidential vacancies and reinstatement. This ambiguity led to confusion, ambiguity and in some cases, deceit.

For instance, in 1841, President William Harrison became the first president to die in office; vice president John Tyler succeeded him. Harrison’s cabinet gave Tyler the title, “Vice President Acting President,” but Tyler wanted more.

He moved into the White House, had himself sworn in as president and assumed full presidential powers, including giving an Inaugural Address. Despite some controversy, Congress eventually confirmed Tyler’s presidency.

In 1919, after having a series of strokes and ignoring warning signs of ill-health and neurological problems, President Woodrow Wilson had a massive stroke from which he never recovered during his presidency.

When his Cabinet suggested the vice president take over, Wilson’s wife Edith and his doctor, Cary Grayson, conspired to keep his condition a secret from both Congress and the public, leaving the United States without a competent leader.
SOUND FAMILIAR?  INSERT JILL BIDEN CONSPIRING HIDING JOE BIDENS DETERIORATING MENTAL HEALTH

After suffering heart problems and a mild stroke, President Dwight D. Eisenhower wrote a confidential letter to Vice President Richard M. Nixon instructing him on what to do if he was incapacitated. Eisenhower identified Nixon as the person who should determine his inability to perform his duties.

The letter wasn’t legal, however, and although Nixon became acting president when Eisenhower had a heart attack in 1955 and again when he had surgery in 1956, Nixon was never sworn in as president during Eisenhower’s terms.

Section 4 of the 25th Amendment has never been used, although the Reagan administration came close. On March 30, 1981, after President Reagan was shot and undergoing surgery, his administration prepared the necessary papers to invoke the 25th Amendment and make Vice President George H.W. Bush acting president.

The papers were never signed, despite some members of Reagan’s administration, Congress and even his doctor advising otherwise.

In 1987, Ronald Reagan was described as inattentive, distracted, lazy and inept by several concerned members of his staff, who suggested invoking Section 4 to remove him from office.

His new chief of staff, Howard Baker, soon determined he was anything but incapacitated and took no action against Reagan. (Reagan was later diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease.)

Portions of the 25th Amendment have been invoked several times.

In 1973, Spiro Agnew became the first vice president to resign due to scandal after being charged with political corruption. The 25th Amendment required then-President Richard Nixon to nominate a new vice president for Congressional approval. Nixon appointed Gerald Ford and Congress approved the nomination.

In August 1974, the 25th Amendment compelled Vice President Gerald Ford to become president after Nixon resigned. This left the vice presidency unoccupied, so Ford invoked the 25th amendment again and nominated Nelson Rockefeller to fill the vacancy.

On July 13, 1985, President Ronald Reagan used the 25th Amendment to transfer power to Vice President George H.W. Bush while he underwent surgery for colon cancer.

On June 29, 2002, President George W. Bush invoked Section 3 of the 25th Amendment prior to going under anesthesia for a colonoscopy and briefly made Vice President Dick Cheney the acting president. He did the same again when he had another colonoscopy in 2007.

Resource: https://www.history.com/topics/united-states-constitution/25th-amendment

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Dave, I got the guacamole with my Chipotle! 😁🥑
(I splurged 🙃🙃)
@DaveRubin
@Michaeltfranke
@TheRubinReport

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This is the face of a sleepy pup 😁 Nala says hi to everyone. HI CLYDE 😍❤🥰❤

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Day #22 of Respect the Constitution

The 18th Amendment - Prohibition.
Prohibited the manufacturing or sale of alcohol within the United States
I will discuss tomirrow, Day #23, about the Repealed December 5, 1933, via the 21st Amendment.

Did you know? Prohibition was known as "the noble experiment." The phrase was coined by President Herbert Hoover, who wrote to an Idaho senator in 1928: "Our country has deliberately undertaken a great social and economic experiment, noble in motive and far-reaching in purpose." It sure sounds like the current lockdown and mask experiment

By the late 1800s, prohibition movements had sprung up across the United States, driven by religious groups who considered alcohol, specifically drunkenness, a threat to the nation. The movement reached its apex in 1919 when Congress ratified the 18th Amendment, prohibiting the manufacture, transportation and sale of intoxicating liquors. Prohibition proved difficult to enforce and failed to have the intended effect of eliminating crime and other social problems–to the contrary, it led to a rise in organized crime, as the bootlegging of alcohol became an ever-more lucrative operation. In 1933, widespread public disillusionment led Congress to ratify the 21st Amendment, which repealed Prohibition.

Origins of Temperance Movement

A wave of intense religious revivalism that swept the U.S. during the 1820s and 30s led to the formation of a number of prohibition movements driven by religious groups who considered alcohol, specifically drunkenness, a “national curse.” (This revivalism also helped inspire the movement to end slavery.) The first temperance legislation appeared in 1838, in the form of a Massachusetts law prohibiting the sale of spirits in less than 15-gallon quantities. Though it was repealed two years later, Maine passed the first state prohibition law in 1846, and by the time the Civil War began, a number of other states had followed suit.

As early as 1873, the Women’s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU) of Ohio called for the abolition of the sale of alcohol. They were soon joined in the fight by the even more powerful Anti-Saloon League (ASL), founded in 1893 in Ohio but later expanded into a national organization that endorsed political candidates and lobbied for legislation against saloons. Beginning around 1906, the ASL led a renewed call for prohibition legislation at the state level. Through speeches, advertisements and public demonstrations at saloons and bars, prohibition advocates attempted to convince people that that eliminating alcohol from society would eliminate poverty and social vices, such as immoral behavior and physical violence. One prominent temperance advocate, Kentucky-born Carrie Amelia Moore Nation (she called herself “Carry A. Nation”), became known for particularly violent tactics against what she called “evil spirits.” In addition to making protest speeches, Nation was known for breaking saloon windows and mirrors and destroying kegs of beer or whiskey with a hatchet. She was arrested numerous times, and became a household name across the country for her “saloon-smashing” campaign.

From State to Federal Prohibition Legislation

By 1916, 23 of 48 states had passed anti-saloon legislation. Many went further, prohibiting the manufacture of alcoholic beverages as well. After the congressional elections that year, “dry” members (as those who favored a national prohibition of alcohol became known) won a two-thirds majority over “wet” in the U.S. Congress. On January 16, 1919, the requisite number of states ratified the 18th Amendment, which prohibited the manufacturing, transportation and sale of alcohol within the United States; it would go into effect the following January.

Resource: https://www.history.com/topics/united-states-constitution/18th-and-21st-amendments

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Happy Tuesday everybody! Exceeded my goal and did 4.20 miles this morning. I hope you all achieve whatever you set out to accomplish. As for me, I am standing hard with Don't Tread On Me! ❤🇺🇸🤩Hugs 🌻

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This is illegal censorship. 👎

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Day #21 of Respect The Constitution

The 8th Amendment of the Constitution  Prohibits excessive fines and excessive bail, as well as cruel and unusual punishment.

Presently, the Jan 6th 2021 Protestors have been violated of the 8th Amendment.

Jan 6 (2021) Protestors Speak Out On ‘Beatings’ And ‘Torture’ Being Inflicted On Them In Jail

Individuals arrested for their supposed involvement in the January 6 protest who are being held in indefinite pre-trial detention in DC have now been put into solitary confinement as punishment for their appearance in a Fox News show on Sunday where Mark Levin, Julie Kelly and Senator Ron Johnson exposed how they’re being tortured, beaten, racially abused and locked in solitary confinement.

“Now getting reports the Deplorable Jail will be on lockdown as punishment for Mark Levin show last night,” reporter Julie Kelly said Monday on Twitter.

“I’ve heard this from a few sources already this morning.”

“We just found out that are locking us down for an entire week in retaliation for that Levin special on us last night,” a statement Kelly included said. “No phone calls, no rec time, 5 min shower, 24 hrs in our cells.”

“They are trying to silence us for getting the truth out.”

Peaceful Jan 6 Capitol protester Paul Allard Hodgkins was maliciously overcharged by the feds with “obstructing an official proceeding of Congress” and faced 20 years in prison for the crime of taking a selfie on the Senate floor with others as they “cheered and said prayers.”

Hodgkins only spent 15 minutes inside “the people’s house” but after being threatened with two decades in prison he accepted a plea deal leaving him facing some “15 to 21 months [in prison] under federal guidelines.”

The suspects are held in solitary confinement in cells the ‘size of a walk-in closets’ for up 24 hours a day and treated like ‘domestic terrorists’ by jail guards after several law enforcement officers were injured and killed during the January 6 violence at the Capitol, lawyer Joseph McBride said.

McBride, who represents Richard ‘Bigo’ Barnett, 60, of Arkansas – the man known for putting his feet up on Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s desk – claimed that the guards are ‘roughing up’ the siege suspects to show solidarity with law enforcement who protected the Capitol.

‘The DC Central Detention Facility has become Guantanamo Bay for American Citizens,’ McBride told DailyMail.com.

‘In the eyes of the Federal Government, the 2021 Trump supporter is the 2001 religious Muslim. This is demonstrated by the fact that Trump Supporters, type casted as extremists, are being illegally detained pretrial by the United States Government.’

Politico reported in April that detainees are being racially abused by majority-black DC prison guards with a chip on their shoulder against “the largely white defendants.”

For weeks, Capitol riot defendants being held in Washington have complained that they are locked in their cells with virtually no human contact for 23 hours a day. But a startling, graphic account offered publicly in court on Tuesday by one such inmate, Ronald Sandlin, went further: alleging that guards have subjected those charged in the Jan. 6 events to violence, threats and verbal harassment.

“Myself and others involved in the Jan. 6 incident are scared for their lives, not from each other but from correctional officers,” Sandlin said during a bail hearing conducted by video before U.S. District Court Judge Dabney Friedrich. “I don’t understand how this is remotely acceptable,” he added, saying he was being subjected to “mental torture.”

In an unusual direct plea to the judge, Sandlin said another Capitol riot defendant, Ryan Samsel, “was severely beaten by correctional officers, [is now] blind in one eye, has a skull fracture and detached retina.”

Sandlin also described racial tension between minority guards and the largely white defendants, some of whom have been publicly accused of membership in or association with white supremacist groups.

Sandlin said guards tackled “to the ground” one high-profile prisoner, Richard Barnett, 60, who was photographed with his boot up on a desk in Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s office. Sandlin said one of the guards declared, “I hate all white people and your honky religion.”

The fact that most Republican leaders are turning a blind eye to this heinous political persecution and torture is a complete disgrace!

Resource: https://en-volve.com/2021/06/15/jan-6-protestors-speak-out-on-beatings-and-torture-being-inflicted-on-them-in-jail/

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Day #19 of Respect The Constitution

I will be splitting this subject up in 2 days of Respect the Constitution because it's a lot of interesting information.

Six amendments adopted by Congress and sent to the states have not been ratified by the required number of states. Four of these amendments are still pending, one is closed and has failed by its own terms, and one is closed and has failed by the terms of the resolution proposing it. 

Article Five of the United States Constitution details the two-step process for amending the nation's frame of government. Amendments must be properly proposed and ratified before becoming operative. This process was designed to strike a balance between the excesses of constant change and inflexibility.[1]

An amendment may be proposed and sent to the states for ratification by either:

• The U.S. Congress, whenever a two-thirds majority in both the Senate and the House of Representatives deem it necessary; or

• A national convention, called by Congress for this purpose, on the application of the legislatures of two-thirds of the states (34 since 1959).[2][3][4] The convention option has never been used.

To become part of the Constitution, an amendment must be ratified by three-fourths of the states (38 since 1959) by either (as determined by Congress):

• The legislatures of three-fourths of the states; or

• State ratifying conventions in three-fourths of the states.[3][4] The only amendment to be ratified through the state convention method thus far is the Twenty-first Amendment in 1933. That amendment is also the only one that explicitly repeals an earlier one, the Eighteenth Amendment (ratified in 1919), establishing the prohibition of alcohol.[5]

When a constitutional amendment is sent to the states for ratification, the Archivist of the United States is charged with responsibility for administering the ratification process under the provisions of 1 U.S.C. § 106b.[6] Then, upon being properly ratified, the archivist issues a certificate proclaiming that an amendment has become an operative part of the Constitution.[3]

Beginning in the early 20th century, Congress has usually, but not always, stipulated that an amendment must be ratified by the required number of states within seven years from the date of its submission to the states in order to become part of the Constitution. Congress's authority to set a ratification deadline was affirmed in 1939 by the United States Supreme Court in Coleman v. Miller (307 U.S. 433).[4]

Approximately 11,770 proposals to amend the Constitution have been introduced in Congress since 1789 (as of January 3, 2019).[4][7] Collectively, members of the House and Senate typically propose around 200 amendments during each two-year term of Congress.[8] Proposals have covered numerous topics, but none made in recent decades have become part of the Constitution. Historically, most died in the congressional committees to which they were assigned. Since 1999, only about 20 proposed amendments have received a vote by either the full House or Senate. The last time a proposal gained the necessary two-thirds support in both the House and the Senate for submission to the states was the District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment in 1978. Only 16 states had ratified it when the seven-year time limit expired.[9]

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/884468/day-19-of-respect-the-constitution

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Anyone like musubi?

Hawaiian BBq for lunch. Masubi, chicken bbq, my favorite island style macaroni salad and fiery chicken. Leftovers for lunch tomorrow!

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/884030/hawaiian-bbq-for-lunch-masubi-bbq-my-favorite-island-style-macaroni-salad-and-fiery-chicken-left

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These are the faces affected by Newsolini. We are 100% supporting Larry Elder. Dave @DaveRubin please tell Larry we missed him. We would love an opportunity to attend a fundraising live speaking engagement with him. 3 pics

Go 🇺🇸 Larry 🇺🇸 Go
❤🤍💙❤🤍💙❤🤍💙

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Day #18 of Respect The Constitution

The 16th Amendment: Establishing Federal Income Tax

The 16th Amendment to the United States Constitution gives Congress the power to collect a federal income tax from all individuals and businesses without sharing or “apportioning” it among the states or basing the collection on the U.S. Census.

Fast Facts: 16th Amendment

• Event Name: Enactment of the 16th Amendment to the United States Constitution.

• Short Description: Through a constitutional amendment, replaced tariffs with a graduated income tax as the main source of revenue for the U.S. federal government.

• Key Players/Participants: U.S. Congress, state legislatures, political parties and politicians, the American people.

• Start Date: July 2, 1909 (16th Amendment passed by Congress and sent to the states for ratification.)

• End Date: February 3, 1913 (16th Amendment ratified by the required three-fourths of the states.)

• Other Significant Dates: February 25, 1913 (16th Amendment certified as part of the U.S. Constitution), October 3, 1913 (Revenue Act of 1913, imposing the federal income tax is signed into law)

• Little Known Fact: The first U.S. tax code, as enacted in 1913, was about 400 pages long. Today, the law regulating the assessment and collection of federal income tax spans over 70,000 pages.

Ratified in 1913, the 16th Amendment and its resulting nationwide tax on income helped the federal government meet the growing demand for public services and Progressive Era social stability programs during the early 20th century. Today, the income tax remains the federal government’s largest single source of revenue.

First Income Tax Was Supposed to be Temporary

A tax attorney didn’t have much to do before the Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln signed into law the first income tax – The Revenue Act of 1862 – appointing George S. Boutwell to the office of Commissioner of Internal Revenue. The Act was passed as an emergency and temporary measure to help fund the war, and it was supposed to terminate in 1866.

The first income taxes were also higher for wealthier Americans. In 1862 the rate was 3% on income between $600 and $10,000, and 5% on income over $10,000. In 1864 the rate increased to 5% on income of $600-$5,000; 7.5% on income of $5,000-$10,000; and 10% on income of $10,000+.

In 1872, seven years after the war, lawmakers finally did allow the temporary Revenue Act to expire. However, the government continued to raise revenue through income taxes until the Supreme Court declared the Income Tax of 1894 unconstitutional. Then along came the 16th Amendment in 1913 which granted power to Congress to “lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived.”

The IRS’ reputation for being understaffed dates way back to the beginning of the agency. They were supposedly still processing 1917 returns in 1919!

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/882393/day-18-of-respect-the-constitution

Resources: https://www.mwattorneys.com/blog/first-income-tax-was-supposed-to-be-temporary/

https://www.thoughtco.com/us-constitution-16th-amendment-4165999

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It was a wonderful get together with dear Rubin Report friends! We were bummed that Larry Elder cancelled speaking at the fundraiser. @Steve_Olch made an excellent point though. We are good Conservatives and we still need to remain positive for recalling Newsolini. Miranda was the surprise guest at our table! She was the youngest Next Genertion Conservative there and she was so happy to meet the Rubin Report Friends. Angela who was the restaurant owner that we demonstrated for, spoke at the event. Miranda was also thrilled to meet radio host Don Dix of the Don and Jen show. There were food trucks and we got the chicken and waffles and banana foster waffles. Yum. Big hugs ❤🤍💙🇺🇸😍 5 pics

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Day #17 of Respect the Constitution

The Judicial system spun this case into the McCloskeys having to defend themselves because they used their guns.

The pair, who were originally charged with felonies, inked the plea deal with prosecutors earlier this month despite previously pleading not guilty. A judge approved the plea deal on Thursday.

“Mark McCloskey pleaded guilty to a count of fourth-degree assault, which was filed in court Thursday and is a Class C misdemeanor. He was originally charged with unlawful use of a weapon and tampering with physical evidence — both felony charges,” a St. Louis NBC affiliate reported Thursday afternoon.

“Patricia McCloskey pleaded guilty to second-degree harassment, which is a Class A misdemeanor charge that was filed last month when a count of tampering with physical evidence was removed. She also was originally charged with unlawful use of a weapon and tampering with physical evidence,” the outlet noted.

Mark McCloskey has been ordered to pay $750 in fines, and Patricia McCloskey has been ordered to pay $2,000 in fines and $10 to the St. Louis crime victims fund. The pair were also ordered to turn over the two weapons they were pictured holding in a confrontation that went viral last year. The couple’s lawyer asked that the guns either be destroyed or rendered ineffective and sold to a collector as a historical artifact.  The judge denied that request.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/879178/day-17-of-respect-the-constitution

Source: https://www.dailywire.com/news/mark-and-patricia-mccloskey-plead-guilty-to-misdemeanors-agree-to-give-up-guns

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I found this in my feed. This is how you make homemade quinine which is Hydrochloroquine. In India, quinine tonic water is very popular and is known for the HCQ benefits for strengthening the immune system.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/874632/i-found-this-in-my-feed-this-is-how-you-make-homemade-quinine-which-is-hydrochloroquine-in-india

More info https://www.mynaturaltreatment.com/3-highest-natural-sources-of-quinine/

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I am volunteering for being an observer for the Recall Governor election. I hope some of you in CA please consider signing up also. We need to stop election fraud and keep the integrity of the voting process which keeps our democracy. If you want I can email it to you, just let me know. Hugs and let's make a difference 🇺🇸❤🤍💙

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Day #15 of Respect The Constitution

History of 'In God We Trust'

A law passed by the 84th Congress (P.L. 84-140) and approved by the President on July 30, 1956, the President approved a Joint Resolution of the 84th Congress, declaring IN GOD WE TRUST the national motto of the United States. IN GOD WE TRUST was first used on paper money in 1957, when it appeared on the one-dollar silver certificate. The first paper currency bearing the motto entered circulation on October 1, 1957. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) was converting to the dry intaglio printing process. During this conversion, it gradually included IN GOD WE TRUST in the back design of all classes and denominations of currency.

In US history, The motto IN GOD WE TRUST was placed on United States coins largely because of the increased religious sentiment existing during the Civil War. Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase received many appeals from devout persons throughout the country, urging that the United States recognize the Deity on United States coins. From Treasury Department records, it appears that the first such appeal came in a letter dated November 13, 1861. It was written to Secretary Chase by Rev. M. R. Watkinson, Minister of the Gospel from Ridleyville, Pennsylvania.

As a result, Secretary Chase instructed James Pollock, Director of the Mint at Philadelphia, to prepare a motto, in a letter dated November 20, 1861.

It was found that the Act of Congress dated January 18, 1837, prescribed the mottoes and devices that should be placed upon the coins of the United States. This meant that the mint could make no changes without the enactment of additional legislation by the Congress. In December 1863, the Director of the Mint submitted designs for new one-cent coin, two-cent coin, and three-cent coin to Secretary Chase for approval. He proposed that upon the designs either OUR COUNTRY; OUR GOD or GOD, OUR TRUST should appear as a motto on the coins.

The Congress passed the Act of April 22, 1864. This legislation changed the composition of the one-cent coin and authorized the minting of the two-cent coin. The Mint Director was directed to develop the designs for these coins for final approval of the Secretary. IN GOD WE TRUST first appeared on the 1864 two-cent coin.

The use of IN GOD WE TRUST has not been uninterrupted. 

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/872436/day-15-of-respect-the-constitution

Resource: https://www.treasury.gov/about/education/Pages/in-god-we-trust.aspx

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Here is a good interview with the Black Rifle Coffee founders that went public yesterday. I believe the NYT is putting out a hit piece to create Kung foo fighting amongst its customers/supporters and trying to hijack their brand. So I will be supporting them and continue having a wonderful cup of Black Rifle Coffee every morning.

Credit resource: @Steve_Olch

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Dave, you are mentioned in the article.

‘I’ll See You In Court’: Larry Elder Slams California Secretary Of State For Letter Which Claims He ‘Did Not Qualify As A Candidate’

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/871530/good-larry-elder-is-a-badass-and-i-hope-he-exposed-ca-corrupt-dem-supercharged-political-machine

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@DaveRubin
I really enjoyed your interview with Larry Elder!

Dave, I am excited about doing some fundraising for Larry. Can we do an online RR Livestream with Larry Elder and those that participate can donate a certain amount as a fundraiser?

If you are doing a fundraiser at your own location, would you please extend the invitation to RR Members? There are some loyal followers and supporters for Larry Elder (including me) that would love to attend and support the fundraiser you would be hosting.

I am still trying to fill the 8th seat at our VIP sponsor table named "Dave Rubin Report Locals.com" Larry Elder will be speaking at this Gavin Newsome Recall Event fundraising dinner event this Friday in Chino.

Bug hugs ❤
@TheRubinReport

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Happy Birthday David @Davidjanet
This is my favorite picture of both of you.
I hope you had a great weekend celebrating!
Love and Hugs 🎂❤
-K
@DaveRubin
@TheRubinReport

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Dave @DaveRubin Larry posted this today.
We Love You and support you Larry Elder
@TheRubinReport

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@DaveRubin did you hear about this? This is another good topic to discuss with Larry Elder. @TheRubinReport

America First' rally canceled in Anaheim amid 'public safety concerns,' city officials say

https://abc7.com/america-first-rally-anaheim-gaetz/10893930/

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Day #13 of Respect The Constitution

“A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

Amendment II of the US Constitution

Constitutional Carry/Unrestricted/Permitless Carry

Constitutional/Permitless carry means that a permit is not required to carry a concealed handgun. It is also known as unrestricted carry. There are states that are fully permitless, where no permit is required for open or concealed carry. Whereas others are partially unrestricted, where open carry may be legal without a permit, while concealed carry may require a permit. Each state sets the age limits as well as other restrictions. The states below allow permitless concealed carry (PC) and open carry (OC): 

open carry (OC): 

• Alaska (PC-21, OC-18)

• Arizona (PC-21, OC-18)

• Arkansas (PC & OC-18)

• Idaho (PC & OC-18)

• Iowa (PC & OC-18 as of July 1, 2021)

• Kansas (PC-21, OC-18)

• Kentucky (PC-21, OC-18)

• Maine (permits recognized; see Maine Reciprocity section for details or PC & OC-21)

• Mississippi (PC & OC-18)

• Missouri (PC & OC-19 or 18 for military)

• Montana (PC & OC-18)

• New Hampshire (PC & OC-18)

• North Dakota (PC-18 for residents only and concealed carry only, OC-18)

• Oklahoma (PC & OC-21 or 18 for military)

• South Dakota (PC & OC-18)

• Tennessee (PC & OC-21 or 18 for members of the military as of July 1, 2021)

• Texas (PC & OC-21 as of September 1, 2021) 

• Utah (PC & OC-21) 

• Vermont (PC & OC-18)

• West Virginia (PC-21, OC-18)

• Wyoming (PC-21 as of July 1, 2021, OC-18)

States with jusrlt permitless open carry include the following, although there may be local restrictions:

• Alabama (OC-18)

• Colorado (OC-18)

• Delaware (OC-18)

• Louisiana (OC-18)

• Michigan (OC-18, for residents only, with registered guns)

• Nebraska (OC-18)

• Nevada (OC-18)

• New Mexico (OC-19)

• North Carolina (OC-18)

• Ohio (OC-18)

• Oregon (OC-18)

• Pennsylvania (OC-18)

• Virginia  (OC-18)

• Washington (OC-21)

• Wisconsin (OC-18)

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/865408/day-13-of-respect-the-constitution

Resource: https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/resources/terminology/types-of-concealed-carry-licensurepermitting-policies/unrestricted/

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Dave this is something you need to talk about with Larry Elder tomorrow.

Larry Elder not listed on California recall candidate roster

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/larry-elder-california-recall-candidate-roster

@DaveRubin @TheRubinReport

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Day #12 of Respect The Constitution

My hope is we will see 2 important court cases be heard. #1 the case against Big Tech and violating Freedom of Speech and the 230 Bill. #2 the upcoming cases filed for Arizona and other states violating the voting process and creating an unfair 2020 Presidential election.

The best-known power of the Supreme Court is judicial review, or the ability of the Court to declare a Legislative or Executive act in violation of the Constitution, is not found within the text of the Constitution itself. The Court established this doctrine in the case of Marbury v. Madison (1803).

People also ask What are the 3 powers of the Supreme Court?

The judicial Power shall extend to all Cases, in Law and Equity, arising under this Constitution, the Laws of the United States, and Treaties made, or which shall be made, under their Authority;--to all Cases affecting Ambassadors, other public ministers and Consuls;--to all Cases of admiralty and maritime Jurisdiction ...

Landmark United States Supreme Court Cases

Marbury v. Madison (1803)

Issue: Who can ultimately decide what the law is?

Result: "It is explicitly the province and duty of the Judicial Department to say what the law is."

Importance: This decision gave the Court the ability to strike down laws on the grounds that they are unconstitutional (a power called judicial review).

McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)

Issue: Can Congress establish a national bank, and if so, can a state tax this bank?

Result: The Court held that Congress had implied powers to establish a national bank under the "necessary and proper" clause of the U.S. Constitution. The Court also determined that United States laws trump state laws and consequently, a state could not tax the national bank.

Importance: The McCulloch decision established two important principles for constitutional law that continue today: implied powers and federal supremacy.

Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)

Issue: Can states pass laws that challenge the power of Congress to regulate interstate commerce?

Result: The Court held that it is the role of the federal government to regulate commerce and that state governments cannot develop their own commerce-regulating laws. Further, the Court created a wide definition for “commerce,” reasoning that the term encompassed more than just selling and buying. In this case, the Court determined that regulating water navigation was in fact an act that regulated commerce.

Importance: The impact of Gibbons is still felt today as it gives the federal government a much-broader base to regulate economic transactions.

Dred Scott v. Sandford (1857)

Issue: In this pre-Civil War case, the question was whether Congress had the constitutional power to prohibit slavery in free territories. A second question was whether the Constitution gave African Americans the right to sue in federal court.

Result: The 1857 Court answered no on both accounts: Congress could not prohibit slavery in territories, and African Americans also had no right to sue in federal court. In reaching these answers, the Court, interpreting the Constitution as it existed before the Civil War Amendments (Constitutional Amendments 13, 14, and 15) abolished slavery, concluded that people of African descent had none of the rights of citizens. The Court further reasoned that slaves were "property" and therefore could not be taken from their owners without due process.

Importance: The Dred Scott case became a central issue in the debate surrounding the expansion of slavery and further fueled the flames leading to the Civil War.

Schenck v. United States (1919)

Issue: Is certain speech, including sending antiwar pamphlets to drafted men, made in wartime and deemed in violation of the Espionage Act, protected by the First Amendment?

Result: No. Although the defendant would have been able to state his views during ordinary times, the Court held that in certain circumstances, like this case the nation being at war, justify such limits on the First Amendment.

Importance: The Schenck decision is best known for creating the "clear and present danger" test meaning that speech could be restricted if it presented a clear and present danger. The decision was also the first to explain the metaphor of falsely yelling "Fire!" in a crowded theater. Schenck was later modified by Brandenburg v. Ohio, which said that speech could be restricted if it would provoke an "imminent lawless action."

Brown v. Board of Education (1954)

Issue: Do racially segregated public schools violate the Equal Protection Clause?

Result: Yes. A unanimous Court overturned Plessy v. Ferguson and held that state laws requiring or allowing racially segregated schools violate the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. The Court famously stated "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal."

Importance: The Brown decision is heralded as a landmark decision in Supreme Court history, overturning Plessy v. Ferguson (1896) which had created the "separate but equal" doctrine. In Plessy, The Court held that even though a Louisiana law required rail passengers to be segregated based on race, there was no violation of the Fourteenth Amendment's Equal Protection Clause so long as the accommodations at issue were "separate, but equal." By overturning this doctrine, the Brown Court helped lay the ground for the civil rights movement and integration across the country.

Gideon v. Wainwright (1963)

Issue: Does the Constitution require that any individual charged with a felony, but unable to pay for a lawyer, be guaranteed the free assistance of legal counsel?

Result: Yes, according to a unanimous Supreme Court. The Court held that the Sixth Amendment right to assistance of counsel applies to criminal state trials and that "lawyers in criminal court are necessities, not luxuries."

Importance: Along with the right to assistance for state criminal defendants, the Gideon decision had the effect of expanding public defender systems across the country.

Miranda v. Arizona (1966)

Issue: Are police constitutionally required to inform people in custody of their rights to remain silent and to an attorney?

Result: Yes, the Court found that the Fifth and Sixth Amendments require police to inform individuals in custody that they have a right to remain silent and to be assisted by an attorney. According to the Court, if the police fail to do so, a criminal court judge may rule that any statements made by the accused cannot be admitted as evidence during trial.

Importance: The now famous "Miranda warnings" are required before any police custodial interrogation can begin if any of the evidence obtained during the interrogation is going to be used during a trial; the Court has limited and narrowed these warnings over the years.

 Tinker v. Des Moines (1969)

Issue: Does the First Amendment prohibit public school officials from barring students' from wearing black armbands to symbolize anti-war political protest?

Result: According to the Court, yes. The Supreme Court held that students do not "shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech…at the schoolhouse gate." Consequently, the Court found that the students' speech could only be prohibited if it actually disrupted the educational process. Because there was no evidence of such a disruption, the school was in violation of the First Amendment freedom of speech.

Importance: Tinker has become the central case for any challenges to school-based First Amendment rights.

Roe v. Wade (1973)

Issue: Does the Constitution prohibit laws that severely restrict or deny a woman's access to abortion?

Result: Yes. The Court concluded that such laws violate the Constitution's right to privacy. The Court held that, under the Fourteenth Amendment Due Process Clause, states may only restrict abortions toward the end of a pregnancy, in order to protect the life of the woman or the fetus.

Importance: Roe has become a center-piece in the battle over abortion-rights, both in the public and in front of the Court.

Regents of the University of California v. Bakke(1978)

Issue: Can an institution of higher learning use race as a factor when making admissions decisions?

Result: The Court held that universities may use race as part of an admissions process so long as "fixed quotas" are not used. The Court determined that the specific system in place at the University of California Medical School was "unnecessary" to achieve the goal of creating a diverse student body and was merely a "fixed quota" and therefore, was unconstitutional.

Importance: The decision started a line of cases in which the Court upheld affirmative action programs. In 2003, such academic affirmative action programs were again directly challenged in Gratz v. Bollinger and Grutter v. Bollinger. In these cases, the Court clarified that admission programs that include race as a factor can pass constitutional muster so long as the policy is narrowly tailored and does not create an automatic preference based on race. The Court asserted that a system that created an automatic race-based preference would in fact violate the Equal Protection Clause.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/862796/day-12-of-respect-the-constitution

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UPDATE on our VIP Sponsor table: We have 7 of 8 seats filled for the Recall Gavin Newsome Event with Larry Elder and Kevin Kiley speaking. It is $125. Please let me know that you would like to attend this very special and important event.

We have named our Sponsor Table "Dave Rubin Report Locals.com " @DaveRubin please let Larry know we are sponsoring a VIP Sponsor table in his honor and also promoting you and locals.com We would be honored if Larry could pop over at our table. I hope you can try to attend this.

Recapping the info again:
Would any RR members in So CA be interested in going in on a table to attend this event or you can go separately. Here is info

Newsom Recall RallyThe Recall Election is set. Riverside County GOP invites you to join us for a very special GOTV Fundraising Evening!

Recall Election GOTV Dinner & Concert.

Special Guests include ...
Governor Candidates Invited Confirmed Governor Candidates Asm. Kevin Kiley
Larry Elder
Special Guest Speakers Throughout 

>>> Daring Greatly in Concert - 70's Classic Rock<<<When: July 23, 2021Doors Open at 5:00pmVIP Tickets Include Dinner, Drink Ticket and Preferred SeatingDinner via Array of Gourmet Food Trucks6:00p Live Broadcast of Jen & Don Show70's Classic Rock Concert 8 - 10p7:00pm "Friday Night at the French Laundry"8:00p 70's Classic Rock Concert
Governor Candidates Throughout
Where: Hanger #4
8352 Kimball Avenue, Chino, California 91708
For more information and media inquiries, contact Don at
Phone: 202-870-8391
Email: realdondix@gmail.com

https://secure.anedot.com/riversidegopslug/rivcogoprally

@Steve_Olch @DaveRubin @Davidjanet @TheRubinReport

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Day #11 of Respect the Constitution

When Did Mandatory Vaccinations Become Common and The Federal Government backed by the 3 branches make historical decisions?

in 1798, Congress returned to the issue after a high percentage of marine workers succumbed to yellow fever. For the first time ever,, Congress required privately employed sailors to own insurance and authorized the collection of a monthly payroll tax to fund it. John Adams promptly signed the law when it reached his desk.

Chapman states that few founders contested the federal government’s responsibility to protect the population from epidemics like yellow fever. The real issue, he reports, “was which level of government should enact and enforce quarantine.” This was the same question that arose years later when vaccination gained popularity in the medical field. Wendy K. Marine, George J. Annas, and Leonard Glantz explain that while Jeffersonians were uncomfortable with a strong federal role, Jefferson himself favored a bill that required the federal government to “guarantee and distribute effective vaccine” and signed it into law in 1813. Ultimately, Congress decided that the best approach was to leave the implementation of vaccination efforts up to state and local authorities.

America had many years of experience with vaccinations. The Puritans provided for vaccinations against smallpox after an outbreak devastated New England. But immunizations weren’t required anywhere in the United States until 1809, when Boston imposed mandatory vaccination to quell recurring outbreaks of smallpox that patchy, voluntary vaccination was permitting. Subsequently, some states adopted similar legislation. Scholars Alexandra Minna Stern and Howard Markel report that incidences of smallpox markedly declined between 1802 and 1840, but made major reappearances in the 1830s and 1870s when public memory of life imperiled by disease had dimmed and “irregular physicians” of the but made major reappearances in the 1830s and 1870s when public memory of life imperiled by disease had dimmed and “irregular physicians” of the 1850s challenged the practice of immunization with “unorthodox medical theories.” One skeptical leader, British immigrant and reformer William Tebb, claimed, facts notwithstanding, that vaccination induced 80% of smallpox cases. Further, he alleged 25,000 children were “slaughtered” in Britain each year thanks to the program. The arguments were preposterous and contrary to evidence, but resonated with the public.

There’s a striking parallel to current anti-vaxxer scares playing on people’s fears, like the discredited and recanted study that alleged vaccination induced autism. Anti-vaccinationist Dr. J.F. Banton warned that vaccination would introduce “bioplasm” into the bloodstream and expose subjects to the “vices, passions, and diseases of the cow.” Stern and Markel relate that critics of vaccination claimed it was a “destructive and potentially defiling procedure of heroic medicine” akin to blood-letting. Many working-class people voiced the fear you hear today that the work of scientists was an “assault on their communities by the ruling class” and an “intrusion of their privacy and bodily integrity.”

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/859848/day-11-of-respect-the-constitution
More information here:

https://historynewsnetwork.org/article/158827

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I scheduled a Zoom today at 12pm PST.

Torrid Luvr is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Torrid Luvr's Zoom Meeting
Time: Jul 16, 2021 12:00 PM Pacific Time (US and Canada)

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86946387375?pwd=NEhzN3hGTlg4WU1ldldZNjRnZ1NjZz09

Meeting ID: 869 4638 7375
Passcode: 563659
One tap mobile
+16699009128,,86946387375#,,,,563659# US (San Jose)
+13462487799,,86946387375#,,,,
563659# US (Houston)

Dial by your location
+1 669 900 9128 US (San Jose)
+1 346 248 7799 US (Houston)
+1 253 215 8782 US (Tacoma)
+1 301 715 8592 US (Washington DC)
+1 312 626 6799 US (Chicago)
+1 646 558 8656 US (New York)
Meeting ID: 869 4638 7375
Passcode: 563659
Find your local number: https://us02web.zoom.us/u/kiH2CjZrS

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Day #10 of Respect The Constitution

Critical Race Theory is Unconstitutional

One of President Joe Biden’s new executive actions is in violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, according to a coalition of legal foundations and lawyers, which is planning to take legal action to stop it.

On his first day in office, Biden signed an executive order reversing former President Donald Trump’s ban on critical race theory training programs within the federal government.

Christopher Rufo, director of the nonprofit Discovery Institute’s Center on Wealth and Poverty, says Biden’s action will not only lead to further division in the nation, but is also unconstitutional. 

“ … Critical race theory-based programs—which perpetuate racial stereotypes, compel discriminatory speech, and create hostile working environments—violate the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the United States Constitution,” Rufo said in a Jan. 20 statement announcing formation of a legal coalition called Stop Critical Race Theory. 

“The Constitution is very clear. The government has to at least aspire to treat Americans equally,” Heritage Foundation senior fellow Mike Gonzalez told The Daily Signal in a phone interview Friday. 

“Any of these trainings that do not treat Americans equally violate the Constitution,” said Gonzalez, author of the book “The Plot to Change America: How Identity Politics is Dividing the Land of the Free.” 

The legal coalition hopes one of the lawsuits will make its way up to the U.S. Supreme Court, at which point it will argue that the training programs violate the Civil Rights Act of 1964, which “prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin.” 

“Critical race theory is a grave threat to the American way of life,” Rufo said in a statement. “It divides Americans by race and traffics in the pernicious concepts of race essentialism, racial stereotyping, and race-based segregation—all under a false pursuit of ‘social justice.’”

More info and Resource -
https://www.dailysignal.com/2021/02/01/legal-coalition-to-sue-to-stop-feds-critical-race-theory-training/

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Would any RR members in So CA be interested in going in on a table to attend this event or you can go separately. Here is info

Newsom Recall RallyThe Recall Election is set. Riverside County GOP invites you to join us for a very special GOTV Fundraising Evening!

Recall Election GOTV Dinner & Concert.

Special Guests include ...
Governor Candidates Invited Confirmed Governor Candidates Asm. Kevin Kiley
Larry Elder
Special Guest Speakers Throughout 

>>> Daring Greatly in Concert - 70's Classic Rock<<<When: July 23, 2021Doors Open at 5:00pmVIP Tickets Include Dinner, Drink Ticket and Preferred SeatingDinner via Array of Gourmet Food Trucks6:00p Live Broadcast of Jen & Don Show70's Classic Rock Concert 8 - 10p7:00pm "Friday Night at the French Laundry"8:00p 70's Classic Rock Concert
Governor Candidates ThroughoutWhere: Hanger #4
8352 Kimball Avenue, Chino, California 91708For more information and media inquiries, contact Don at
Phone: 202-870-8391
Email: realdondix@gmail.com

https://secure.anedot.com/riversidegopslug/rivcogoprally

@Steve_Olch @DaveRubin @Davidjanet @TheRubinReport

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Good morning and Happy Thursday. I am at the hospital in the waiting room while Miranda has her reconstructive nose surgery. She has had constricted nose breathing since she was little. The dr wanted to wait till she was fully grown to do this surgery. So this is a big deal for Miranda. @Steve_Olch the cup of black rifle coffee was a tremendous comfort for me today ❤ I sure would appreciate prayers and positive thoughts for a smooth surgery for Miranda. Hugs everyone 🌻

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/854920/good-morning-and-happy-thursday-i-am-at-the-hospital-in-the-waiting-room-while-miranda-has-her-re

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Take a few minutes to watch this and breath it in. I teared up. It's beautiful. Hugs and love to each of you 🥰❤

@DaveRubin @Davidjanet @TheRubinReport

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Meet the new Free Capitalist! Today is a big day for Savannah! She got her first job working at the local grocery store. We have been shopping there for 20+ years so I know the staff really well. When Savannah put in an application and mentioned to the manager she would love to work there, the manager set up an interview yesterday and she starts working on Monday. We got her work permit yesterday and today we opened up her first high school checking and savings account ( I am on the acct with her until she changes it to a college acct in a year. Tuesday Savannah takes her 2nd driving class. I need to schedule her senior portraits!
Helping nudge my chickadee out of the nest to let her gain some independence into her adult world.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/853002/today-is-a-big-day-for-savannah-she-got-her-first-job-working-at-the-local-grocery-store-we-have

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Day #9 of Respect The Constitution

Your constitutional rights in the time of COVID-19. 

During the time of COVID-19, governments across the country have sought to restrict the behavior of private citizens and groups in ways that many citizens could not have imagined even a year ago. These regulations have caused many Americans to ask: are these restrictions constitutional? Does the government actually have authority to make these ruled? How much regulation is too much? Can we do anything to prevent these restrictions?

Freedom of religion - 1st Amendment of the Constitution

During the pandemic, many states and localities have passed laws restricting religious gatherings. In Roman Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn v. Cuomo, the Supreme Court held that some of these restrictions violate freedom of religion.

Freedom of Assembly.  The First Amendment says, “Congress shall make no law … abridging … the right of the people peaceably to assemble.” In DeJonge v. Oregon, the Supreme Court held that states and localities could not prohibit freedom of assembly either. The COVID restrictions on public gatherings, may well violate this provision.

Stay-at-home orders, lockdown, quarantine, and restraints on liberty.
The Fifth Amendment says that, “no person shall … be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law” The Fourteenth Amendment states, “nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law”

Several courts have held that stay-at-home orders, lockdowns, and quarantine, unconstitutionally restrict liberty. In County of Butler v. Wolf, a federal court held that Pennsylvania’s stay-at-home order violated the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Property rights and closure of businesses.
In County of Butler v. Wolf, the court held that the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendment protected the right to run a business and pursue an occupation, and that, therefore, the closure of businesses was unconstitutional.

The Fifth Amendment further states that, “nor shall private property be taken for public use, without just compensation.” In Lingle v. Chevron USA, the Supreme Court held that “government regulation of private property may, in some instances, be so onerous that its effect is tantamount to a direct appropriation or ouster — and that such ‘regulatory takings’ may be compensable under the Fifth Amendment.” In Lucas v. South Carolina Coastal Council, the Supreme Court held that if a regulation “denies all economically beneficial or productive use” of property, then the regulation is a taking under the Fifth Amendment. Because many of the COVID lockdowns are particularly onerous, and some lockdowns have deprived business owners of all beneficial or productive use of their property, the regulations may well be takings, under the Fifth Amendment.

Contact tracing and reporting of personal information

Many governments have employed “contact tracing” in which the government gathers information about a person’s movements and contacts. In Carpenter v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court held that the government could not search a person’s cell phone records without a warrant. The Court held:

“when an individual ‘seeks to preserve something as private,’ and his expectation of privacy is ‘one that society is prepared to recognize as reasonable,’ official intrusion into that sphere generally qualifies as a search and requires a warrant supported by probable cause”

This could invite the conclusion that a government does not have blanket power to trace a person’s contacts, and obtain a person’s medical information, without a warrant supported by probable cause.

Right to refuse medical treatment

In Cruzan v. Director, Missouri Department of Health, the Supreme Court held that persons had a constitutional right to refuse medical treatment. Some of the forced measures to prevent the spread of COVID, may infringe on this right.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/852457/day-9-of-respect-the-constitution

Resource - https://www.persaudlawoffice.com/post/your-constitutional-rights-in-the-time-of-covid-19

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Would any of you llike to Zoom this Friday at noon 12pm PST? This is the perfect time for our Europe friends across the Pond to zoom. @Peter @Kelvin_Pell @Andersen

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/852402/would-any-of-you-llike-to-zoom-this-friday-at-noon-12pm-pst-this-is-the-perfect-time-for-our-europe

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Day #8 of Respect The Constitution

Today is a big day for The 15th Amendment of the Constitution!   The first black candidate for the Governor of California, Larry Elder, has registered in The County Registrar today for the special election of the Recall of Gavin Newsome.  I deeply respect Mr Elder.  I hope he wins! ❤🤍💙🇺🇸🤩

So what is the 15th Amendment?  The right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/850441/day-8-of-respect-the-constitution

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My first Grill Master in training! So proud of my Amanda ❤ Maryssa did the seasoning. 😍 4 pics
See Video here: https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/846282/my-first-grill-master-in-training-so-proud-of-amanda
@Daverubin @Davidjanet

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Monday Meme. The VIRAL Left

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Day #7 of Respect The Constitution

The 7 Articles of the US Constitution

To understand the framework of the Constitution when the nation was first being established out of the 13 British colonies, this document is a blueprint. Its seven sections (or Articles) detail the core components of how the framers wanted the government to run the country.

Relating to Article #2, the Biden Administration has failed in preserving, protectiong and defending the Constitution. It has also abused its powers making unethical partnerships with other nations such as China and Iran, appointing federal judges to pack the Supreme Court, department heads and using the military operations to fulfill its discriminative and unethical narrative for sexual orientation and race theory.

Present Concern about Article III: Presently, The Democrat led Congress wants to pack the Supreme Court not benefit the Citizens but to fulfill their political narrative.

Currently, The Biden Administration has purposefully ignored Article IV which are the duly appointed powers of each state and their relative laws and responsibility to the Federal government.

Interesting fact: Article VII declared that the Constitution would come into effect once nine of thirteen states had ratified it; and as it happened two states, North Carolina and Rhode Island, did not ratify until after George Washington had been inaugurated as the first President under the Constitution

• Article I – The Legislative Branch. The principal mission of the legislative body is to make laws. It is split into two different chambers – the House of Representatives and the Senate. Congress is a legislative body that holds the power to draft and pass legislation, borrow money for the nation, declare war and raise a military. It also has the power to check and balance the other two federal branches.

• Article II – The Executive Branch. This branch of the government manages the day-to-day operations of government through various federal departments and agencies, such as the Department of Treasury. At the head of this branch is the nationally elected President of the United States.

The president swears an oath to ‘faithfully execute’ the responsibilities as president and to ‘preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States’. And its powers to include making treaties with other nations, appointing federal judges, department heads and Ambassadors, and determining how to best run the country and run military operations.

• Article III – The Judicial Branch. Article III outlines the powers of the federal court system. Determines that the court of last resort is the US Supreme Court and that the US Congress has the power to determine the size and scope of those courts below it. All judges are appointed for life unless they resign due to bad behaviour. Those facing charges are to be tried and judged by a jury of their peers.

• Article IV – The States. This article defines the relationship between the states and the federal government. The federal government guarantees a republican form of government in each state, protects the nation and the people from foreign or domestic violence, and determines how new states can join the Union. It also suggests that all the states are equal to each other and should respect each other’s laws and the judicial decisions made by other state court systems.

• Article V – Amendment. Future generations can amend the Constitution if the society so requires it. Both the states and Congress have the power to initiate the amendment process.

• Article VI – Debts, Supremacy, Oaths. Article VI determines that the US Constitution, and all laws made from it are the ‘supreme Law of the Land’, and all officials, whether members of the state legislatures, Congress, judiciary or the Executive have to swear an oath to the Constitution.

• Article VII – Ratification. This article details all those people who signed the Constitution, representing the original 13 states.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/845208/day-7-of-respect-the-constitution

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Day #6 of Respect the Constitution

The Preamble

Presently, The Biden Administration has executed orders against the very fabric of The Preamble. They have abused Federal powers against Individual Peoples Rights in each state. The Preamble was created at the Constitutional Convention in the summer of 1787. It was probably written by Governeur Morris, who drafted much of the rest of the Constitution.

The preamble sets the stage for the Constitution. It clearly communicates the intentions of the framers and the purpose of the document. The preamble is an introduction to the highest law of the land; it is not the law. It does not define government powers or individual rights.

The Preamble of the U.S. Constitution—the document’s famous first fifty-two words— introduces everything that is to follow in the Constitution’s seven articles and twenty-seven amendments. It proclaims who is adopting this Constitution: “We the People of the United States.” It describes why it is being adopted—the purposes behind the enactment of America’s charter of government. And it describes what is being adopted: “this Constitution”—a single authoritative written text to serve as fundamental law of the land. Written constitutionalism was a distinctively American innovation, and one that the framing generation considered the new nation’s greatest contribution to the science of government. 

The word “preamble” usefully conveys the idea that this provision does not itself confer or delineate powers of government or rights of citizens. Those are set forth in the substantive articles and amendments that follow in the main body of the Constitution’s text. It was well understood at the time of enactment that preambles in legal documents were not themselves substantive provisions and thus should not be read to contradict, expand, or contract the document’s substantive terms.  

Interesting fact: Article VII declared that the Constitution would come into effect once nine of thirteen states had ratified it; and as it happened two states, North Carolina and Rhode Island, did not ratify until after George Washington had been inaugurated as the first President under the Constitution

The other purposes for adopting the Constitution, recited by the Preamble— to “establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity”—embody the aspirations that We the People have for our Constitution, and that were expected to flow from the substantive provisions that follow. The stated goal is to create a government that will meet the needs of the people. 

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/842835/day-6-of-respect-of-the-constitution

Resource - https://constitutioncenter.org/interactive-constitution/interpretation/preamble-ic/interps/37

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Day #5 of Respect The Constitution

Simplified version and simplified examples of the 27 Amandments of The Constitution. ** I want the 28th Amendment to have Term Limits to Congress and The Senate***

The 27 Amendments Simplified
1. The freedom of religion, speech, and to peacefully assemble together.
2. The right to own a gun.
3. The right to not house a solider.
4. The right to not be searched or have something taken away within reason.
5. The right to life, liberty, property, and no double jeopardy or self-incrimination.
6. The right to a speedy trial, public trial, and with a jury of your peers.
7. The right to an jury trial in a civil case.
8. Protection from excessive bail, and cruel and unusual punishments.
9. The rights not listed in the Constitution.
10. Any rights not given to the federal government are given to the states.
11. Protects the states from law suits.
12. There are separate ballets for the President and Vice President.
13. The abolishment of slavery.
14. Equal protection under the Constitution for all United States citizens.
15. No voting discrimination of race.
16. Income tax is legal.
17. Popular vote for United States Senate.
18. Prohibition of alcohol.
19. Women's right to vote.
20. Moving of dates for terms of presidency.
21. Repeal of prohibition of alcohol.
22. Limits the terms Presidents can serve.
23. Washington D.C. have the right to vote for President.
24. No poll taxes are allowed.
25. The succession for presidency shall something happen to the President.
26. The minimum voting age is 18.
27. Congress cannot get a pay raise until the next term.

Examples of the Amendments
1. Every person has the right to go to any place of worship that they choose to attend.
2. Everyone has the right to legally obtain a gun.
3. If a solider comes to your home, you do not have to house him or her.
4. Nobody can search for or take anything of yours because they do not like you.
5. If you have been tried and found innocent for a crime, you can not go to trial on that crime again.
6. The people in your jury will be from your social class.
7. If you have a law suit filed against you, you can have a jury trial.
8. There will be no punishment that would be considered torture.
9. If there is a right not listed in the Constitution it is assumed to be a person's right.
10. The state can choose how to teach students in their state.
11. You cannot sue your state.
12. The electoral ballets are different for President and Vice President to avoid confusion.
13. You cannot enslave or be enslaved by anyone.
14. Everyone gets treated equal under the law.
15. Every single male United State citizen that is of age can vote.
16. Congress has the right to make an income tax to get money for the government.
17. The Senate does not go through an electoral college.
18. Alcohol was made illegal and declared unconstitutional for a period of time.
19. All citizens are now given the right to vote.
20. The term for presidency now begins in January instead of March.
21. Alcohol is not longer illegal or unconstitutional, you just have to be 21 to drink.
22. No one person can serve more than two terms of presidency.
23. Washington D.C. has the right to vote for President.
24. You cannot recieve a tax at the poll.
25. If the President were to become ill, the Vice President would be his successor.
26. Once you are 18 you have the right to vote.
27. Congress cannot increase their pay during a term, just because they feel like it.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/839394/day-5-of-respect-of-the-constitution

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Day #4 of Respect The Constitution

The Bill of Rights

One of the principal points of contention between the Federalists and Anti-Federalists was the lack of an enumeration of basic civil rights in the Constitution. Many Federalists argued, as in Federalist No. 84, that the people surrendered no rights in adopting the Constitution. In several States, however, the ratification debate in some States hinged on the adoption of a bill of rights. The solution was known as the Massachusetts Compromise, in which four States ratified the Constitution but at the same time sent recommendations for amendments to the Congress.

James Madison introduced 12 amendments to the First Congress in 1789. Ten of these would go on to become what we now consider to be the Bill of Rights. One was never passed, while another dealing with Congressional salaries was not ratified until 1992, when it became the 27th Amendment. Based on the Virginia Declaration of Rights, the English Bill of Rights, the writings of the Enlightenment, and the rights defined in the Magna Carta, the Bill of Rights contains rights that many today consider to be fundamental to America.

Here are the 10 Amendments of the Bill of Right.  At this very moment The Left is breaking the Laws governing these 10 amendments.  The accused being detained unlawfully in Federal Prison from the January 6th invasion of the Federal Capitol Building (falsely AKA) "The Insurrection".  These incarcerated individuals are being held unlawfully according to the 1st Ten Amendments of the Constitution.  This needs to be addressed and properly rectified in a legal manner. Once you read the Amendments you will understand my concern.

The First Amendment provides that Congress make no law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting its free exercise. It protects freedom of speech, the press, assembly, and the right to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

The Second Amendment gives citizens the right to bear arms.

The Third Amendment prohibits the government from quartering troops in private homes, a major grievance during the American Revolution.

The Fourth Amendment protects citizens from unreasonable search and seizure. The government may not conduct any searches without a warrant, and such warrants must be issued by a judge and based on probable cause.

The Fifth Amendment provides that citizens not be subject to criminal prosecution and punishment without due process. Citizens may not be tried on the same set of facts twice and are protected from self-incrimination (the right to remain silent). The amendment also establishes the power of eminent domain, ensuring that private property is not seized for public use without just compensation.

The Sixth Amendment assures the right to a speedy trial by a jury of one’s peers, to be informed of the crimes with which one is charged, and to confront the witnesses brought forward by the government. The amendment also provides the accused the right to compel testimony from witnesses, as well as the right to legal representation.

The Seventh Amendment provides that civil cases preserve the right to trial by jury.

The Eighth Amendment prohibits excessive bail, excessive fines, and cruel and unusual punishments.

The Ninth Amendment states that the list of rights enumerated in the Constitution is not exhaustive, and that the people retain all rights not enumerated.

The Tenth Amendment assigns all powers not delegated to the United States, or prohibited to the States, to either the States or to the people.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/837209/day-4-of-respect-the-constitution

Resource - https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/our-government/the-constitution/

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Perfect for a summer party
@Davidjanet

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We all know who Scar is....

Connect with me at The Torrid Tribe

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/834913/we-all-know-who-scar-is

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Day #3 of Respect The Constitution

Written in 1787, ratified in 1788, and in operation since 1789, the United States Constitution is the world's longest surviving written charter of government.  The Constitution also provides that the Senate advise and consent on key executive and judicial appointments and on the approval for ratification of treaties.

A chief aim of the Constitution as drafted by the Convention was to create a government with enough power to act on a national level, but without so much power that fundamental rights would be at risk. One way that this was accomplished was to separate the power of government into three branches, and then to include checks and balances on those powers to assure that no one branch of government gained supremacy. This concern arose largely out of the experience that the delegates had with the King of England and his powerful Parliament. The powers of each branch are enumerated in the Constitution, with powers not assigned to them reserved to the States.

As a reflection on current times, The Left is trying to strengthen National government which is against the function of the Constitution which grants the Federal government limited powers.  

The need for the Constitution grew out of problems with the Articles of Confederation, which established a “firm league of friendship” between the States, and vested most power in a Congress of the Confederation. This power was, however, extremely limited—the central government conducted diplomacy and made war, set weights and measures, and was the final arbiter of disputes between the States. Crucially, it could not raise any funds itself, and was entirely dependent on the States themselves for the money necessary to operate. Each State sent a delegation of between two and seven members to the Congress, and they voted as a block with each State getting one vote. But any decision of consequence required a unanimous vote, which led to a government that was paralyzed and ineffectual.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/833815/day-3-of-respect-the-constitution

More resource info is available here https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/our-government/the-constitution/

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Day #2 of 30 days Respect of The Constitution

Declaration of Independence (Pre Constitution)

In Today's times, The Left is trying to steer this country away from the Rights of this country's founding document. They are moving us away from Democracy and toward Socialism. Our Founding Fathers are ROLLING in their graves!

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness."

What are the 5 main parts of The Declaration of Independence -
The Preamble, the Statement of Human Rights, Charges Against Human Rights, Charges Against the King and Parliament, and the Statement of Separation and Signatures.

The Left is also trying to alienate the ideologies and legal truths about these 3 major ideas -
People have certain Inalienable Rights including Life, Liberty and Pursuit of Happiness.All Men are created equal.Individuals have a civic duty to defend these rights for themselves and others.

What was the true meaning of the Declaration of Independence? When the Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776, it was a call for the right to statehood rather than individual liberties, says Stanford historian Jack Rakove. Only after the American Revolution did people interpret it as a promise for individual equality.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/830074/day-2-of-30-days-respect-if-the-constitution-declaration-of-independence-pre-constitution-in-t

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30 Days of Respect of The Constitution Day #1

I wanted to reflect on Independence Day. I am posting daily for 30 days about The Respect of the Constitution. I hope we learn more. I hope we feel more engaged in the ideologies of the importance of this document and how it provides each of us Freedom and Liberty.

Day #1
America's FOUNDING documents

These three documents, known collectively as the Charters of Freedom, have secured the rights of the American people for more than two and a quarter centuries and are considered instrumental to the founding and philosophy of the United States.

The Declaration of Independence expresses the ideals on which the United States was founded and the reasons for separation from Great Britain.

The Constitution defines the framework of the Federal Government of the United States.

The Bill of Rights is the first 10 amendments to the Constitution. It defines citizens’ and states’ rights in relation to the Government.

The Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom is located on the upper level of the National Archives museum, the Rotunda for the Charters of Freedom is the permanent home of the original Declaration of Independence, Constitution of the United States, and Bill of Rights.

Designed by architect John Russell Pope as a shrine to American democracy, the ornate Rotunda with its soaring domed ceiling also features two murals by Barry Faulkner, depicting fictional scenes of the “presentations” of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/827704/30-days-of-respect-of-the-constitution-day-1

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Grilling porterhouse steaks on the barbie. Sauted onion/mushrooms, baked yukon potatoes, corn on the cob, baked beans and mac & cheese. Salad to start it all off!
Celebrate ❤🤍💙🇺🇸

Connect with me at the Torrid Tribe

https://thetorridtribe.locals.com/upost/822851/grilling-porterhouse-steaks-on-the-barbie-sauted-onion-mushrooms-baked-yukon-potstoes-baked-beans

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Day #30 Month of Respect 🇺🇸❤
GOD ❤ BLESS 🤍 AMERICA 💙

How Fireworks Became a Fourth of July Tradition

John Adams did say he hoped the anniversary of independence would be marked for years to come by “guns” and “bonfires” and “illuminations.” Because the first July 4 fireworks display happened in the middle of the Revolutionary War, some historians believe they were supposed to be a “morale booster.” The celebrations at the time would have also included the firing of cannons and guns, adding to the explosive nature of the festivities. With the war’s end and increasing concern for public safety, those firearms were eventually phased out of the celebrations and replaced almost entirely by the fireworks, which were often given the official stamp of approval in the hope of drawing citizens to public celebrations instead of more dangerous private firework shows.

Today, though fireworks are now a well-established July 4 tradition, they’ve still retained some link to their origins: in 2016, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, $296.2 million worth of fireworks were imported to the U.S. from China.

Source: https://time.com/4828701/first-fireworks-history-july-4th/

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Starting out the day with sushi brunch. I ordered this cute cake from the bakery and they included these cute poppers for the girls to set off tonight. I loved my Freedom Black Rifle coffee this morning (thank you @Steve_Olch) I have good ol' American pie for dessert tonight. We will be grilling porterhouse for dinner. Refreshing Watermelon and cherries while we enjoy the pool. It's a beautiful day to celebrate America 🇺🇸❤
4 pics

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